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All American Swim Blog

Perfect Your Race Day Routine

Competitive swimmers put in hours training in and out of the pool, all in preparation for race day. Whether you are aiming to best your own time or you want to win that medal, race days are both exciting and nerve-wracking. You want all of that hard work to pay off. Before you dive off of the blocks, though, take the time to figure out what race day routine works for you. Here are a few tips for crafting the best race day routines for swimmers. Read More

Improve Swimming Speed

In 2010, Michael Phelps reached a swimming speed of about six miles per hour. The record for swimming a men's 50-meter short course (50 meters in a 25-meter pool) is 20.91 seconds. Not every swimmer is going to achieve Olympic Gold and record-shattering speeds, but it does spark inspiration to move faster through the water during your swim workouts. The four basic swimming strokes are freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke and butterfly. While you move your body differently for each stroke, the main determinants of speed are thrust and drag. The water provides resistance (or drag) while your arms and legs propel (or thrust) you through the water. Learning how to effectively move your body through the water for each different stroke will help improve your time. Read More

How to Avoid Burnout and Overtraining for Swimmers

Competitive swimming takes long hours and personal commitment. Early mornings in the pool, tailoring your meals to keep your body in the best possible shape and mentally rehearsing every stroke all leads up race day. Race day should be exciting, the culmination of all of your hard work. But all competitive athletes, swimmers included, are at risk of overtraining and burning out during those long hours of practice. Burnout in competitive swimmers can lead to poor performance and ultimately the abandonment of the sport. Losing the passion for swimming can be extremely disappointing, but luckily, burnout is not inevitable. Learn how to avoid burnout in swimmers with these helpful tips. Read More

How to Stop Goggles From Fogging Up

Swimming is an intense, competitive sport. Athletes dedicate countless hours, both in and out of the pool, to improving their time. You set goals for yourself, work with your coach and hone your technique in hopes it will all pay off on race day. When that day finally comes, you feel nervous but prepared. All you need to do is focus on your stroke. The buzzer goes off, and you hit the water — but then your goggles fog up, and your focus is instantly shattered. All swimmers know the importance of good gear, and foggy goggles are a common challenge for all swimmers. While this issue might be annoying on a practice day, it can mean the difference between victory or defeat on race day. How do you stop your goggles from fogging up? First, you need to know what is causing the problem, and then you can learn how to prevent it. Read More

Different Swimming Strokes and Their Benefits

Competitive swimmers race in a variety of different strokes. The freestyle and butterfly races are some of the most highly anticipated events at the Olympics. But, you don't have to be a professional or competitive swimmer to enjoy the benefits of swimming. Learn about the benefits of different swimming strokes to help you decide how you want to do your laps in the pool. Read More

How to Train to Swim in a Triathlon

Triathlons are physically challenging competitions. Triathletes begin the event by swimming, biking and then finally running to the finish line. Depending on which triathlon guidelines the event adheres to, the distance for each portion of the challenge will differ. For example, the Olympic guidelines for a triathlon include 0.93 miles of swimming, 24.8 miles of bicycling and 6.2 miles of running. An Ironman Triathlon ups the challenge with 2.4 miles of swimming, 112 miles of bicycling and 26.2 miles of running. Other variations on the triathlon will require different distances or even mix up their order of events. Regardless of which guidelines your event follows, you will need to get into the water and swim. Read More

How to Protect and Remove Chlorine From Your Hair, Skin and Suit

One of the best things about summer is getting to cool off in the pool. Whether you have a pool at your home or you like to make trips to a public pool, there's one thing they all have in common: chlorine. Chlorine is a chemical that helps keep pools safe, so you don't come away from a swim having been exposed to dangerous biological contaminants. This is especially important in public pools since you never know what viruses or germs people may introduce into the water. Read More

Stretches for Swimming Warmup

Regularly stretching your muscles is beneficial. It feels good, and it helps keep you flexible. You have probably heard you should stretch before you go for a run, but did you know you should do the same before you jump in the pool for a swim? Swimming puts less stress on your joints than running and a lot of other on-land exercises, but it is still a physically demanding activity. Pushing your body directly into a hard workout increases the risk of injury, such as tearing of your muscle fibers. Stretching helps warm up your muscles, which increases range of motion. Just seven quick minutes of stretching before you swim help get your body properly warmed up for the laps ahead. Read More

Tips for Swimming Long Distance

Long-distance swimming is an intense and rewarding challenge. Some swimmers like to go the distance purely for exercise, while others are in it for a race. Whether you are looking to add miles to your workout or you are gearing up for the swimming portion of a triathlon, distance swimming takes preparation. As with any form of intense exercise, your muscles need time for training. You don't want to find yourself exhausted in the middle of a workout or a race. Learn how to swim long distances with tips on techniques for in and out of the water. Read More

How to Improve Your Swimming Breathing Technique

Breathing is an essential element of swimming. Some people believe that you should hold your breath while underwater, but what you should do is learn how to control your breath. As you practice the proper breathing techniques for swimming, you can improve your lung capacity and overall performance. Dive in and learn how to breathe while swimming. Read More

Benefits of Training with a Swim Snorkel

Swim training can take many different forms. At the most basic level, all you need is your swimsuit and a pool. But, swimmers have plenty of different tools that can up their training regimens. Swim snorkels can help you hone your technique as you prepare for a big race day or work on improving your times.  Read More

8 of the Best Training Aids for Swimming

Swim aids are special tools and equipment that are crafted to help you learn how to swim faster and more efficiently. Some training aids are designed specifically for children and novice swimmers, while others are developed for more professional uses. Investing in high-quality, durable training aids is one of the most helpful steps you can take when trying to challenge or grow your aquatic ability. Whether you are new to swimming, teaching somone else or training hard to perfect your skills, using training aids during your lessons can help you improve your skills, master techniques and keep you safe.  Read More

Dryland Workout

Try this dryland workout for your core, upper and lower body. Read More

Swimming Dryland Workout

This dryland workout includes light cardio, core, lower body and upper body exercises.  Read More